Bounty of the garden

The bounty of our garden never includes vegetables because we have too much shade — but oh! Everything else!

Rhodies bursting into color. Comfrey stretching up in regal glory. Ferns gone wild.

Tidying the front bed a little. Planted two creeping junipers.

Everything (almost) dies under the front black walnut, so this year I’m going to plant some tall grasses in containers for a little screening.

In between ruining my hands weeding and planting, work is getting finished.

Cupcake pin cushion construction learned years ago from artist whose name I’m sorry I can’t recall but does it matter when there are thousands of tutorials on it now and Pinterest pix in the millions?

I like this new one because the open frets of the vintage button offer an easily identifiable spot for needles.

19 thoughts on “Bounty of the garden

    1. deemallon Post author

      The ostrich ferns are so big and resilient they amaze me every year. We have Christmas ferns, staghorns, and Japanese as well.

      Reply
    1. deemallon Post author

      I father them every year and only once out them to any use. Email me your address and I’d be happy to send you some. Don’t think these can ship internationally, though?

      Reply
    1. deemallon Post author

      Yes. We’re getting our first summery day as the chill sets in for you fills down under.

      Reply
    2. Tina

      I’m always amazed when I’m reminded that we live on opposite sides of the earth .. at the same time so closely connected. Big Wowza .. 😘

      Reply
  1. Liz A

    Our green is heading toward summer-dormant brown … and yeah, we always had too much shade to grow veggies in Virginia … now we have too many deer (and armadillos and raccoons and heat)

    I do miss rhododendrons … thanks for the memory

    Reply
  2. Nancy

    OH MY!!! Your greenery is gorgeous! Those ferns…fantastic! The cloth on the door, so dashing and the Cupcake pin cushion sounds like a perfect project! Such an uplifting post!

    Reply
    1. deemallon Post author

      Thanks Michelle. I’ve researched lists of plants that tolerate the jingles toxin before, of course, and one result is that thriving currant bush almost next to it. But I hadn’t read about organic matter and its relationship to the poison’s uptake. Thank you!

      Reply
  3. Fiona

    So beautifully green! Our bounty is mushrooms from the compost this week (shared 3kg today alone), oranges which are being juiced and made into marmalade and cakes; and avocados – a rich mix at the moment. So nice to see summery things your way!

    Reply
    1. deemallon Post author

      Wow what delectable things to have in one’s garden! It was in the 80’s yesterday. Did the crossword puzzle out on the deck. Yeah!

      Reply
  4. ravenandsparrow

    Your yard has many things in common with ours, including rhododendrons, but your ferns are really impressive. The red of the door and its enticing cloth make a perfect complement to the green of the garden.

    Reply
    1. deemallon Post author

      The ferns were nearly wiped out after an excavator occupied our backyard for a month (to dig a basement for an addition). But boy did they come back. It’s nice to have something thrive because we’ve been losing a lot of plants, too. This spring I’ll be replacing two holly bushes on the south side of the house that looked gorgeous for about ten years and then precipitously declined. A spice bush did the same a couple years back.

      Reply

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