PPE : two versions of mask

If you don’t have twist ties, cut wire and fold ends with needle nose pliers. These are about 4″ long when finished.

Cut CLOTH RECTANGLES 7.5″ x 14″

Press under each short end 1/8″ and then at the machine, turn another 1/8″ under and stitch for a finished hem.

Fold rectangle to create “envelope.”

Stitch across top flap to create a 1/4″ channel for wire. Insert wire and then stitch channel closed at ends of wire.

Cut FOUR straps — 12″ x 1″

Press in half, then fold sides to center, fold on top of each other, and stitch.

Take the envelope and stitch three pleats per short side for a finished length of 3.5″

Cut TWO facings 4″ x 1.25 or 1.5″

Stitch to wrong side. Lay two straps at the edges, fold facing over to right side and stitch, tucking ends of facing in and capturing straps.

Fold straps back on themselves to the outside and top stitch several times for strength.

These straps are longer than 10”

Deb found another version below. It offers an elegant simplicity. Three pieces only! No nose wire, but does feature the pocket for filter.

My understanding is that hospitals will wash and sterilize upon receipt but check before dropping off. Many hospitals in the Boston area will accept only masks made from fabric that they supply.

14 thoughts on “PPE : two versions of mask

  1. RainSluice

    I’ve been making the others ones. I cut a lot of fabric and I’m trying to crank out a few a day. There’s a church down the street that is collecting them for Cooper Hospital (I think). These news ones look pretty daunting to make but I’ll try. Can you use coat hangers for wire? I think probably not… not bendy enough. Well, we have a couple of reasons to visit Lowe’s so will add wire to the list! Thanks, Dee! I shared on FB you probably noticed. How’s your brother doing? and your boys?

    Reply
    1. deemallon Post author

      So far so good on western family. Coat hangar way too thick. There’s no real reason to switch to the harder pattern. If you look at the second video, it looks like a winner!

      Reply
      1. Mag

        Oh good 🙂 thanks Dee! And yes I’m thinking too I’ll make couple to have around home just in case this isn’t going to be gone – say, by tomorrow. Jezzuz. Awful.
        Glad about fam, Dee.

        Reply
  2. Acey

    One thing that’s started happening here via organized grassroots efforts is making masks to supply neighborhood essential services for employees and customers/clients. I’ve also made a small tote full for my son and the two other essential employees where we he works. Have enjoyed – if that’s the right word for it – working with what’s right to hand. Think maybe it’s wise to keep plenty for those where we live. It it does get to the point of a few months rolling by – we’ll all have to risk being out and about beyond property safe zones etc.

    Reply
    1. deemallon Post author

      I noticed Saskia is making them for her parents’ caregivers. That got me thinking along the same lines.

      Reply
  3. Nanette

    I’ve been ma,ing them for a charity that asked for them and will distribute, mentioned them to a friend who immediately requested some…..her and her hubby work at Coles supermarket……and some of her co-workers have now requested them too…..so I’m keeping busy. They’re a nice easy make in between other tasks.

    Reply
  4. Hazel

    Thank you for all of this Dee. Still trying to find out if there is a place in Seattle to make them for? One hospital offered up kits with their fabric, but have run out. A local furniture manufacturer is busy making them, too. I’ll keep looking… it would be great to be able to make something that’s needed.

    Reply
    1. deemallon Post author

      I haven’t found anywhere yet. I figure I’d contact the Hospice people who tended my sister if I don’t see some other request in line before then. One friend I know is making them for her town’s firefighters. Saskia is making them for her parents’ caregivers. I’m gonna send a couple to my boys. One to wear, if need be, and one to be in the wash.

      Reply
  5. Liz A

    I remember my mom telling of rolling bandages during World War II … found some fascinating stuff online about the Junior Red Cross

    Thanks for the instructions … I’m still working up the moxie to make some masks

    Reply

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