Fragile

Can I just say, yesterday I got spooked. It wasn’t just the fear of falling on black ice, it was also the hearings with all that gaslighting, inverting of sense and fact. How the lying seems to work. By now, too, I know that I always feel terrible after trump has been abroad. The embarrassment and the visible costs of his corrupt incompetence are harsh to note.

How fragile it all seems! I know people say it all the time, but yesterday I felt it in my body. How we might not make it. As a republic or a planet.

Prompt after writing prompt produces articulations of rage and despair about climate deniers and about the damage itself. After teaching Tuesday’s class (on Zoom because of the snow emergency), I thought, why does this keep coming up? Then yesterday: why doesn’t it come up more?

In fact, how can we talk about anything else?

Tomorrow there’s a climate strike in Copley Square. I’m not planning to go. It’s been a long week with K in China and back to back snowstorms. But I laud the young people skipping school to protest — getting their priorities right.

The first thing I listened to this morning was the inspiring, intelligent, beautiful Naomi Klein. She and Rebecca Solnit keep trying to remind us that climate denial is violence. Abuse. Part of a pattern of corporate greed.

It’s worth the six minute listen.

PS A few weeks ago, I read Maddow’s book about ‘the world’s most destructive industry on earth’ — the fossil fuel industry. Amazing how much is about Russia.

13 thoughts on “Fragile

  1. grace

    oh, Dee. Yes. All she said. But we already know that. It’s Klein, Good Woman Klein, but who is she speaking to?
    is it possible there are those who will hear a new message? Who? This is not new.

    It IS them, those grossly opportunistic fearmongers, but really…it’s us too….the majority
    who will just go along and get along because it’s too hard. As old Gore said, it’s an
    inconvenient truth.

    Reply
    1. deemallon Post author

      It isn’t anything we haven’t heard before, true, but since the cloak of denial and inaction, even among those of us trying to pay attention, is thick and weighted with habit, I think it bears repeating. And her message of hope, however bracketed by information about catastrophe, seems to be something I need to hear frequently. It’s hard to hold it in my head or heart.

      I wonder what she would say, though, if asked: who are you speaking to? It’s a good question.

      (I think she has a new book out, so in part it is to get that word out.)

      Reply
      1. Anonymous

        A new book. Nice.
        I think it will be when stuff doesn’t work any more.
        We will go…oh, now what.
        Maybe great granddaughter Emrie will be a young adult then? I will be dead.
        But maybe it’s as close as her? …she is 2 now
        But what about in the meantime, all the lifeforms that will be required to make great CHANGE???
        Do they matter?
        I want to scream
        I am working so hard, so sweaty to understand this

        Reply
        1. Anonymous

          A new book. Nice.
          I think it will be when stuff doesn’t work any more.
          We will go…oh, now what.
          Maybe great granddaughter Emrie will be a young adult then? I will be dead.
          But maybe it’s as close as her? …she is 2 now
          But what about in the meantime, all the lifeforms that will be required to make great CHANGE???
          Do they matter?
          I want to scream
          I am working so hard, so sweaty to understand

        2. deemallon Post author

          Well if we have twelve years to act and acting would require fundamental, widespread and radical change, it’s going to affect people older than Emrie — including my boys (in their twenties).

  2. Joanne

    Anyone with children and grandchildren should take serious notice. Here in Maine the effects are already obvious. Less rain. Less snow. Colder. Hotter. The soil is dry and lifeless. All we need is Wind and what soil we have will blow away.

    Reply
    1. deemallon Post author

      Here in Massachusetts the seasons are hardly recognizable at times. An entire summer without rain. A winter with nine feet of snow. Hemlocks dying of disease. Ash. When we first lived in the house, one or two weeks in August were unbearably humid and hot. Not it’s as much as eight weeks.

      Reply
  3. Liz A

    I dunno … watching Maddow last night as she listed all the evil doings of Russia … but then, the horrific drawings of a CIA torture victim’s experience … “we the people” are as bad or worse than the Russians, the Chinese, the North Koreans, the Saudis because we know better and can be better than we are … I am sickened by all of it

    Reply
    1. deemallon Post author

      Yes. It was eye popping. Sickening as you say. And it punctured that head wagging idea that’s been floating around for some time about how, against all odds, here was someone (trump) who makes bush look pretty good.

      Reply
  4. Saskia van Herwaarden

    ugh the world just seems crazier than it used to be, or maybe I’m growing old and therefore more realistic and pessimistic; I remind myself to keep looking at our children, the younger generation offers hope

    Reply

Love to hear what you think!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s