Tag Archives: piecing

Now there are four

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/f6f/5880966/files/2015/01/img_7288.jpg
And if I just keep going, as some of us fiber folks like to say, at some point there will be 48 or 64 or however many I will need.

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/f6f/5880966/files/2015/01/img_7283.jpgNot a huge fan of jackets for dogs, especially for those canines bred to manage just fine in the Alps, but they are saying frost bite will be a risk after thirty minutes or less of exposure tomorrow, and Finn is very lean. So here he is, looking stylish in camo!

He did NOT fare well in his crate this morning for my much abbreviated run to Salem. Oh well. A little backsliding is not the same as failure!

Friday in between

IMG_6503Yesterday’s meal and company and fire were nice: delicious, warm, companionable. We had a couple of birthdays to celebrate, too.

IMG_6467.JPGIMG_6464.JPGIn the quiet aftermath, I have resumed work on the second Middle Passage quilt. In this one, the top band of cohesive and colorful culture is very narrow and grows increasingly fragmented as one works down toward the bottom, where the ocean resides.

IMG_6501.JPGThe pale green and white triangles are meant to signify the sails of the slave trading ships. The brown striped batik also signifies the slavers, but this time, the planking on the ships.

I forgot how much I like working this way.

deemallon, quilt, piecingIMG_6489Using photo apps to strip out color or intensify it can be a useful trick to find weaknesses in design.

I blogged about the first (and now complete) Middle Passage quilt here, but it occurs to me I have yet to post a good picture of it, finished and bound.

I’m afraid from now until the end of the year, my felt creatures will be hogging most of my time (not to mention Christmas), but in the New Year? Archives of everything! Binding and finishing at an amazing clip! With no significant writing time consumed!

 

Corn guy and Womb

IMG_5131.JPGFunny to be weaving “fall” when it got so sticky hot here today. This guy got his start on a napkin-basket-loom.  I was trying out some things from the weaving class with Jude Hill (Spirit Cloth, side bar), and sort of having fun.  The warp caught in the grooves of the basket edges and stayed put well enough, but I could only use tape to secure it on the back, so it got loose in places — sometimes to the point of near unworkability.
IMG_0009 IMG_4746Mostly today I pieced rectangles of cotton together, pressed the seams one way or the other, and enjoyed the cool of my basement.  I ran the fan all day to churn some of the mildew smell out the back door. That sounds awful but it wasn’t. It was a nice retreat after two very intense weeks of travel and settling the boys in.
IMG_0278In fact, the cool quiet of the cellar was perfect for my first ‘official’ day of the empty nest — a day that found me tired, disoriented, a little sick, and in real need of silence.IMG_0295 I stitched a linen frond to the woven island piece (above, left) and excavated some of the sections representing Africa from the Middle Passage series (above, right)IMG_0297In the little square above, I put some of the ‘Ghost House’ remnants next to fabrics being used to designate ‘Strange Fruit’ in the ‘White House of Privilege’ series. A panel with a moon stitched on it is being blown sideways by the fan.  I like that almost more than anything else!IMG_0302 IMG_0308 IMG_0310Middle Passage scraps partnered with Ghost House piecing (above). Reading the recent ‘Atlantic’ article, ‘The Case for Reparations’ (by Ta-Nehisi Coates) has got me thinking about all this again (as if the events in Ferguson, Missouri weren’t prompt enough)…IMG_0316And all these tiny little ‘doodles’ wanting a home. The grid has one inch squares, so you get the scale.
IMG_5030I’ll close with a few pix from Vermont.  We camped at a state park located on an island in Lake Champlain.  We did this to save money, but it was really wonderful!  So quiet. So pretty.

IMG_5107.JPG
IMG_5101.JPGIMG_5024.JPGIMG_5021.JPG

IMG_5016.JPG
IMG_0269The weather was perfect, and it was nice, as it turns out, to break up the drive and the border crossing over separate days. Since we’ve had some really nice visits to Montreal, including a few memorable dinners, there was no feel of a pauper’s compromise in this plan — none at all. IMG_5084IMG_5092Look at those skies!!

accepting today’s piecing

IMG_9202The cloth I pieced this morning makes me think the Road to Subtle is a long one for me. The pattern/color has a way of creeping in even when I intend otherwise. It looks paler without light shining from behind, but still….
IMG_9204I LIKE it and will enjoy continuing with it… but it’s funny how pale it started… how much I wanted to combine very subtle gradations of yellow, blue, green, and grey. Part of this not-so-subtle result might be a stash issue — as hard as it might be to believe that I don’t have enough fabric!!

The collage below ALSO departs from the original intention. I thought I might be on the road to creating a Tarot deck. Collected Fool and Joker images. Wanted to start with Zero and proceed through the Majors one by one. Flipped and fluttered through my papers.

What I got instead is a “Michelle Card”.  The trademarked SoulCollage process invites the maker to create archetypes, inner aspects of the self, and animal guides. But it ALSO suggests creating cards honoring people in one’s community.  Michelle in NYC has been looking out for a young pigeon this week (see her blog, Ms. Uncertainty Principles). Her actions and photos were the impetus behind this collage (not yet a card).
MichelleThe little open book in the corner is a reference to her being a writer.  That the marbled paper on the right looks like a series of hearts really pleased me, since her actions are so much from the heart. The veined lotus came from a Peabody Essex Museum brochure cover. Even IT seemed to reference Michelle and her Buddhist practice.  The map behind the dove is a ripped and re-arranged map of the Gulf, highlighting areas of concern after the Deep Well incident.

perspective – not necessary, but good!

house-before-roof-and-side-fix

straight base translates as flat; roof line doesn’t match up with house

This white house emerged months ago as I pieced up muslin for what would become the “Red House”. I was immersed in barn raising at the time.

sideways

pin board

house-and-chair

roofline better; perspective created with a single strip of blue floral slanting up from front corner to back corner

Two different green plaids are used in the roof. I think another piece is required to overhang that right rear facade.

real rooflines

real rooflines – earlier in season, many years ago

There are flash flood warnings here.  My phone actually honked to tell me so. Based on the rain and wind, I would not have guessed there to be any danger (and maybe there isn’t).

Speaking of phones, when I took my failing-to-connect-to-the-internet iPhone to the Genius Bar, everything operated just perfectly. The ‘genius’ took notes (on his tablet, naturally), but I could tell he thought I was a technology-challenged moron (and maybe I am). However, I came home and all the same problems reasserted themselves. And I don’t see how it could be an issue with our router, because everyone else in this household is connecting to the internet just fine.

As maddening as these tech issues have been — for weeks now (Photoshop crashed twice while posting yesterday — one time recovering; one time not) —  I really could use some perspective there as well.

What is the emotional equivalent of a blue strip of fabric lightly laid, just so, to make the line of the foundation travel back? What perspective would ease getting through a series of technology issues that show no sign of easy resolution and that undercut my ability to stay connected (and THERE’s the psychological metaphor for one of the mechanical failures — it’s always there).

“WALK AWAY FROM THE SCREEN, Dee” isn’t going to cut it for much longer. I should take Michelle’s comment from yesterday to heart: “Breathe”.

progress in white

Slowly getting the hang of our updates. There definitely are improvements in the offing.  For now, I am just moments shy of a good, long walk in the spring air, then it will be time to walk to the periodontist for the insertion of an implant (yes, sympathy is welcome!)

In other words, this post will be quick. A report in pictures. WH = “White House”, the very original name for this piece.

WH - scraps laid out

WH – scraps laid out

WH-full-orig

WH – seamed, with some embroidery

WH-right-corner-orig

WH – pre-whitening close up

WH-rt-stitched

WH – same area, both whitened and layered (the silk had color and pattern)

WH-upLT-pinned

WH – sheers pinned over whitening white running stitch (grey splotchy roof does not stay)

WH-upRT-pinned

WH – sheers pinned on the other side of the roof

WH-top-stitched

WH – more whitening with the addition of white running stitches (grey roof is gone)

sheering-sky-4

WH – celebrating the shredding orange silk by tacking it down; one sheer had embroidered loops on it, seen here

v-fading

WH – getting there

WH - hanging

WH – hanging

trued, aligned, pressed

barn-in-reverse

Technical jargon offers specificity.  Like any vocabulary, it often resonates with multiple meanings, meanings that don’t have much to do with the task at hand.  Every time I ‘true’ a quilt top, for instance, the other senses of that word ‘true’ are present.
barn-waiting-to-be-trued western-windows

Aligning a design’s intended sight lines brings deep satisfaction – perhaps satisfaction that is very tied to the processes of  ‘aligning’ and ‘righting’.  Maybe the more we recognize how much of life is beyond our control, the more satisfaction these miniscule attempts at order are (enough said! enough said!).

barn-pins

barn-rotary

The final six or seven seams of a mid-sized or large pieced quilt top require more precision than comes naturally to me.  Since I know what the pay off is here (for pinning, for cutting straight lines, for re-working the crooked), I settle into a slightly different rhythm and mindset.  In other words, I don’t mind.

‘Re-working the crooked’.  There it is again! Language that describes both the inner and the outer.   If I had to describe one inner crooked line that could use some re-working?  That strange belief that holds one person can change or fix another.

barn-and-board

Barn II.  The final six seams of the quilt top were machine-stitched and the seams pressed, on Monday.  I won’t go into what yesterday entailed.  On to quilting!!!