Tag Archives: double exposures

disappearing, disappeared

IMG_2349The “Hearts for Charleston” quilt has been set aside for personal, holiday sewing. But I wanted to post some of the photos that I continue to obsessively create on my iPhone (with the dianaphoto app).  For some reason, these photos have a way of making the awful shooting of June 17, 2015 more real to me. Perhaps it’s their haunting quality. Or maybe it’s the way that the heart can be made to disappear and how that hints at loss in a potent way.

This pink heart with a shibori’d circle will be dedicated to Myra Thompson, who was 59 at the time of her death. A proper post will follow down the road, but here are some of the photos, starting with the ‘straight up’ quilt block front and ending with the actual block’s back.


  
      

To read more about the “Hearts for Charleston” quilt project,
please refer to the the sidebar category
of the same name.

Original vs reproduction. Reading Walter Benjamin. 

Last weekend, I fInished two books. A compelling memoir by Ta-Nehesi Coates (below) and a slender volume called “The Ghost of Hampton Plantation.”  More on those later.  On our way to Salem on Memorial Day, a parade in Peabody forced a new route. We enjoyed hot dogs and beans with my sister.

A friend dropped by. We took Finn over to Crystal Lake where he found a dead fish to roll in. That was as gross as her gift of a silk kimono was delightful.   Of course, I couldn’t resist a little photo play with the wavy lines in the kimono.  Which leads me to this: I have been thinking a lot about “the made thing” (involving time, skill, energy, and occupying a place in tradition) vs. the reproduction. Mo kindly insisted I read an essay by Walter Benjamin on the topic (see comments a couple of posts ago).  I resisted. Even though it would be easy to discount what he had to say because he wrote the piece decades before Warhol and Rauschenberg, never mind digital media, I was nevertheless impressed. He supported his central thesis about the superiority of the original, crafted work to reproductions in a compelling way.

For those of us abiding in practices of Slow Cloth, Benjamin’s words stand as important reminders about why we do what we do — even when it makes no economic sense.

He wrote:  The authenticity of a thing is the essence of all that is transmissible from its beginning, ranging from its substantive duration to its testimony to the history which it has experienced. Since the historical testimony rests on the authenticity, the former, too, is jeopardized by reproduction when substantive duration ceases to matter. And what is really jeopardized when the historical testimony is affected is the authority of the object.  And:  One might generalize by saying: the technique of reproduction detaches the reproduced object from the domain of tradition. By making many reproductions it substitutes a plurality of copies for a unique existence.     … the instant the criterion of authenticity ceases to be applicable to artistic production, the total function of art is reversed. Instead of being based on ritual, it begins to be based on another practice – politics.

Very provocative.

Not sure where that leaves double exposures created by tapping a teeny screen and hitting a “save” icon.

I mean, these are pictures that may never even assume the form of a print. Is that yet another level of degradation? And if the original work has elements of the religious, and the reproduction has characteristics of the political, what does the binary-coded “work” in the cyber sphere embody?

I would like to read a more recent essay on the same topic. One written post-internet.

Crescent of light

It is bitterly cold today. Cops tend a downed wire at the corner. Gusts of wind are taking branches down and forcing kids on the playground to wear hats. Finn and I take brisk but short walks around the neighborhood. All of a sudden it is a new year.

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/f6f/5880966/files/2015/01/img_7203.jpgThe light is different already. I noticed it on the buildings near the airport this morning. I noticed it on this Chinese plate this afternoon. Less wan and with a little more warmth.
light-chinese-plate-deemallonI don’t seem to know what I am doing anymore. Or maybe transitions throw me more than they used to. Back to the empty nest, which now includes Finn so it’s a lot less empty, but still….

Here is a rambling list of hopes/intentions for the new year — only things on my mind at the moment, and not an attempt at comprehensive breadth or corrective sway:  I hope to make a blanket for one of the boys this year. And then for the other next year. They have twin sized quilts but it’s time for doubles. I would like to read a little more this year. Walk a lot more. Let more stuff roll off my back, even if it means letting go of reactive anger and feeling more sadness. I plan to learn how to sharpen knives in 2015. And, I am going to get rid of a lot more shit.  A lot more. (It continues to amaze me how satisfying this decluttering process is!) Better blogging – especially, reading favorites — I HOPE so. Progress on the writing front — I HOPE so.  Continued health of my loved ones — I chant daily.

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/f6f/5880966/files/2015/01/img_7207.jpgAnd now I’ll leave you with a double image that serves as a visual prayer from me to you for the New Year — may you have more abundance, joy, ease!

PS  Finn ate the Nine of Cups this morning.  Thankfully, I have a spare deck which now will only serve to supply replacement cards, though of course the full deck is boxed and out of reach now!

Year ending

puppy, gaze, deemallon

Christmas Day at my sister’s

Finn: best Christmas present, ever!!

IMG_7138Because I’m not really “back” yet, here come some more double exposures. After being challenged by an African American artist about my choice of slavery as a topic over on Instagram recently, I decided to make a few collages with Irish imagery. To see what came. This was an impulse already in the making. Lots more to think and feel about all of this, but for tonight I’ll let the pictures do the talking.

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/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/f6f/5880966/files/2014/12/img_7101.jpgSources: the Irish female figure is a screen shot of a drawing found on internet; the three male figures appeared in an episode of “Peaky Blinders” last night, so they are a TV screen shot. The enslaved female appeared on an episode of “Finding Your Roots” (with Henry Louis Gates, Jr.,) — also recently watched; also, therefore, a TV screen shot. Cloth layers: various. Some of the Solstice Collages crept in as well.

Happy New Year, all! I can’t wait to get to all the blogs that I love to read!

Platinum sky

IMG_6572.JPGWondered as I took this picture what a House Series would look like if most of the house was out of the frame.

IMG_6567.JPGCapturing this little boy on his bike created a story. Where is he going? Is he cold (I was)? Who is protecting him?

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And later, still with the idea of protection, I thought about Imagemaking as a form of Prayer. Not Artist-as-Channel, where any creation made in the zone (i.e. connected to holy source) makes the Making a form of prayer. But rather imagemaking as prayer for someone, the way a Unity Church group, for example, might pray for someone. Below combines at least 3 images.

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