Tag Archives: log cabin

Cool day, warm colors

It’s snowing hard. The tension on my machine is off. The Great British Baking Show is on.

Warm colors are nice this time of year. This wonky log cabin will be a baby blanket. We called baby blankets, “baa-baa’s” in this house. How about in yours?

I used to go down to Pembroke to a fabric wholesaler to buy cotton and scissors. Not so, these eight-inch dressmaking shears. They came from Amazon.

Just so you know (re: my carbon footprint), Pembroke is probably a 40 minute drive.

I’d been sawing at cloth for nearly a year. Having sharp scissors in the house is as delightful as getting a decent haircut was last week!

PS. The light behind the quilt makes clear there is at least one seam that needs straightening. You know it’s crooked if I’m prepared to fix it!

Teeny vs regular

2015/02/img_7737.jpgI am piecing up the tiny scraps that come with making the log cabin squares. Not surprisingly, I prefer the teeny compositions. I am intrigued by their scale and the sense of possibilities. Each could stand alone or they could be combined into a cloth that hangs together. How to decide?!!

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2015/02/img_7738-0.jpgAnd, guess what? It’s snowing again!
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Four more squares and fourteen more inches

snow-ice-deemallonA big snow carries a hush… a quieting of the entire landscape. I don’t understand how or why, and I don’t care to know — it is so palpable and so delicious.
path-snow-deemallonFor those of us lucky to have shelter and little employment outside the four walls of that shelter, a big storm creates sanctuary, too. Suddenly there is nowhere to go. Nothing to buy. No appointment worth the venture.  Add to that — the maternal attention and collapse of routines that come with a new puppy and time really turns in on itself. I am made both smaller and larger by the circumstances. My mantra is: “for now”.

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Five

iron-cloth-deemallonI understood why, working in the basement studio in the winter, standing on a heating pad, wearing Dickensian gloves, and a down vest, the iron’s heat proffered so much comfort. Well, it turns out, even upstairs in the glare of morning light, with a fire going and heat on, I love the feel of warm cloth.

This is square five. I have to tackle, earlier rather than later, what to do about my aversion to uniformity measuring. Three of the squares are roughly the same size. Two are a bit bigger, and by “a bit”, I mean enough to matter.

I am thinking of marking the top of the green bookcase in the living room to use as a template.  Turns out it is exactly as wide as the three same-sized squares.

Which leads me to this.  A couple of goals emerge as I piece: I want to avoid the use of rotary cutter and mat, and I would like to use fabrics already in my possession. The latter commitment may be difficult, because I am also going to be picky about keeping my blues and greens in the right value family.

Finn and I walked and made it back. It’s not so bad out. Growing up in Upstate New York, it was often this frigid. As kids we called it, “booger freezing weather”. Rarely happens around here.
tissue-trunk-duskBut don’t get me wrong – I am super grateful to have the luxury of spending the rest of the day inside, at home!

P.S. The above picture from Sketchbook Project efforts a couple years back, reminds me that I will NOT be participating again… it turns out that letting the booklet go at the end, even knowing that it is (sort of) circulating, is not satisfying.

Now there are four

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And if I just keep going, as some of us fiber folks like to say, at some point there will be 48 or 64 or however many I will need.

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/f6f/5880966/files/2015/01/img_7283.jpgNot a huge fan of jackets for dogs, especially for those canines bred to manage just fine in the Alps, but they are saying frost bite will be a risk after thirty minutes or less of exposure tomorrow, and Finn is very lean. So here he is, looking stylish in camo!

He did NOT fare well in his crate this morning for my much abbreviated run to Salem. Oh well. A little backsliding is not the same as failure!

Because it rained

20140729-082526-30326986.jpgThank goodness it rained on the last Sunday in July, because instead of taking a walk that morning, I went to the MFA.  It was the last day of a quilt show that it would have killed me to miss.
IMG_4648There were about six rooms of beautiful traditional quilts, with a lot of text about the collectors and the quilters’ use of color.  Another friend of mine took exception with how little was said about the MAKERS and how MUCH was said about the collectors.  I spent almost all of my time looking at the quilts, so it wasn’t something I picked up on.  Before I judge the exhibit on this basis, I would want to know what, if anything, they knew about the crafters.  It’s very possible that in the case of many of the quilts, NOTHING was known.

a whole room of Amish quilts!

a whole room of Amish quilts!

In what little text I did read, I noticed an repetitious emphasis on the use of color (we get it! complimentary colors look good together!!) and a real lack of information about the technical structure of the cloths.  Gorgeous trapunto and stippling went without mention; one quilt supposedly had discharged cloth in it where I could find none.

feathered diamond. Penn. 1890's

feathered diamond. Penn. 1890’s

But! I still thoroughly enjoyed the show and firmly believe that quilts belong on the walls of our art museums — and not just the magnificent Gee’s Bend quilts, either.

All the photos were taken with my phone, so please indulge the lack of focus!

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bold and dynamic use of plaid

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An entire room of variations on the Log Cabin pattern was my favorite part of the show, not only because of the quilts themselves, but because the grouping revealed how profound an impact color/value choices have on design.  All the quilts in the room used the very same pattern and yet were radically different from each other.

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unbelievably small strips!

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20140729-082527-30327633.jpgThis was one of many beautiful nine patches in the exhibit.  The show made me appreciate the uses of white when making patterns and colors sing.

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woolen, tied quilt — nine patch and rail fence

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