Tag Archives: village

“Whenever you feel overwhelmed… “


Practice gratitude whenever you feel overwhelmed…. ” Caroline Myss

Well, now, then. Last week, then. The weekend before last… and the one before that. The summer is tumbling by in a blur of obligations, interventions, and work. Indoors time — I’m not used to so much of it. Structured time — I’m not used to so much of that either.  Many changes here.

So, here’s a quick list of things I’m grateful for —

  • time to have worked on this piece for just a little while today. and a sense that perhaps it is inching toward resolution.
  • a cleaned up house on account of company
  • digital images, digital cameras, near-instant gratification of images
  • a new journal arriving in the mail for the Sketchbook project
  • dinner out, featuring tofu, eggplants and Chinese greens I don’t know the name of
  • boys home
  • a home
  • Dexter
  • chocolate

  • Catalpa leaves approaching dinner-plate size
  • the lake vacation to look forward to
  • things growing in my absence

  • making a quilt for a wounded child, knowing I am on the other side of most of that

Treasure Island quilt for a boy

Some of you are familiar with the profoundly moving work of Jungian therapist, Wendy Golden-Levitt.  Her work has been featured in HandEye Magazine and rightfully exalted in the SlowCloth facebook circle.  She has successfully incorporated textiles into her work with traumatized and troubled young clients, finding that the process of relating to a special cloth can facilitate healing.

Well, not long ago, Wendy commissioned a piece from me (YEAH!!!**!!) She had quite a few favorites from my website (not surprisingly, quilts with animals or huts — quilts that one can imagine a young person populating with characters of their own).  However, some of them had been sold and of the remaining pieces, none seemed quite right.  And anyway, the more I thought about making a quilt specifically for her practice, the more excited I became.

So many things to be considered!  The inclusion of fabrics that are lovely to the touch… being sure that the four elements are represented… including figures, both animal and human, that could be repositories of secrets or foils for the imagination… making the landscape mythic, without being scary…

And then I got distracted and busy with other things.  Or did I get stuck?  Sometimes, it’s hard to tell.

As usual, the way “in” for me was a piece of fabric.

Many years ago, my mother-in-law gave me the curtains that she had lovingly made for two of her three sons’ bedroom (we are a blended family, so my husband is not one of her sons).

Initially, as with many well-made gifts of cloth, it was hard to cut the fabric.  These curtains were lined, with beautiful hem stitching, and still clean all these years later!

Probably because I am raising boys, I wanted to make this project for a boy.  When I remembered these curtains, I just knew that they had to be the back of the quilt.  I like the idea of a two-sided blanket, with the narrative on one side supporting and enhancing the story on the other.

Here are things a boy will love — ships, pirates, buried treasure, adventure!!

The more I thought about what it means to be troubled by one’s home of origin, the more the pirate print seemed like a good fit.  If the home is NOT a place of solace and peace (at least MOST of the time — no home is perfect), then one would expect a little soul in search of wholeness to look outside, initially.

To go on a quest to an exotic island and find buried treasure feels like an apt metaphor for the healing process.

The front of the quilt is still being mulled over — but the idea is to create an island village, (African in feel), where there is a central hut — a central hut that is calm and cool in the heat of the savanna… a single structure that visually issues an invitation and that represents a doorway up and into healing.  I plan to include several animals who can be helpers along the way.

Island?  Savannah?  Not quite adding up yet, but the feelings are starting to correspond to fabrics, and that’s how I start.

The strips were woven thinking about creating an island mass, like the one I found in the flickr stream by Yandi (below).  This island is made from reeds and floats in Lake Titicaca.  I made my ‘reed island’ while thinking about the commission, but it probably won’t make it into the piece.

three huts in a row

Last week, in attempt to bring order to chaos, I pieced these three huts. They obviously belong together. But less obviously, they do NOT belong in the large Global Warming quilt (mostly because the colors are off).

So, I remain stumped, and with three garden clients this week, it will have to wait.

But, judging by the vigorous energy applied to removing an invasive ground cover near the driveway this morning, I suspect a resolution is coming soon.

November Sunshine

Fern-Village-and-siding

Well, back to work, it is.  I’m going to bind this Village Quilt with some of the pretty African fabrics that my friend Sarah recently sent me — the one with the red, to pick up the accent color.

Fern-Village

I’ll be showing (and hopefully, selling) at Newton Open Studios this weekend —

November 7 and 8
at Newton’s Cultural Center (on Nevada St.)
11 am to 5 pm
FREE.

But, since I have more quilts than I could possibly show in the booth space allotted, I think I’ll post this one in etsy tomorrow (link on sidebar).

Roof-stitching

Along with this little friend —

Mousey-mouse-and-nut

I STILL can’t believe I found these nut ornaments on sale last January — they are the perfect scale for my felt mice!!

June 2009 Commission

Quilt, about 20" x 26"

Quilt, about 20" x 26"

A neighbor commissioned a quilt to present to a preschool on his younger child’s ‘graduation’.  The Dad wanted something to thank the school for eight years of terrific child care.  The specifications were as follows:

  • bright colors (but not pre-school yucky colors)
  • youthful
  • no balloons
  • feature the words, “Well Loved”

The words were spoken during the first parent ‘pass off’ — “Don’t worry, S. will be well loved!”

preschool-village-close-cloPreschool-Village-close-up