Tag Archives: poppy

Poppy and Mindy

IMG_8873IMG_8898IMG_8868This may need an anchoring sleeve at bottom, but it is otherwise finished. I dyed the dragonfly sheer in the indigo vat two summers ago… the graphic slash-marked bottom fabric, too (though that first went through a bleaching). Many of the petal fabrics came from a wonderful packet sent to me by Sandy Meegan. This poppy is for her!
IMG_8870As for Mindy, just want to say that I find “The Mindy Project” hilarious. Really funny — especially for network television. Or maybe, to be fair — really funny, by any measure. Her fat jokes are funny; her race jokes are funny; her dating jokes get to be a little much, but still funny! I’m a fan.

 

poppy comin’ along

poppy comin' along by dee at clothcompany

This is hanging off the tablecloth in the dining room. A new way to view.

But the real experiment here is ‘sharing’. Keeping it simple… can I find a better way?!!

Shared this photo directly from PSE11 gallery into flickr and now blogging directly from flickr….

Normally, would open PSE organizer, edit, (mostly to re-size) and then save compressed image to a folder (that I now have to triple click and scroll to get to (thank you update!)), THEN go to wordpress and upload image twice (thank you update there, too!! because wordpress recently added an additional step to insert image).

So, does this work?!! Even with a quick edit from wordpress, this is a boatload easier!

Captions post

before-128

before going North on 128

north-shore-lunch

North Shore lunch

poppy-in-center

Thinking about goodbyes

poppy-pinned

Something sweet, fun, and satisfying

tornado-watch

South on 128 during tornado watch

train-tracks

I wish I could be paid for all the time I spend waiting for doctors

unpicking

Tried a red dog like Patricia’s – it didn’t work; trying windows like Jude’s – we’ll see . . .

jack-and-quilt

Spending lots of time with Jack

building forward, looking back

I am in the thick of replacing my website using ‘weebly’ – a drag and drop method.  It’s not that versatile and in fact, very frustrating, but the price is right and at this point (I haven’t added text or images to my existing website in YEARS because it is so cumbersome), almost anything will represent an improvement.

Anyway, I just came across this quilt.  See how important it is to date your work?!  I would have guessed “2008” as the time frame for this poppy, but stitching reveals that it was made in 2002.

I keep wanting to ‘get back’ to poppies and keep finding that I don’t.

Do any of you, dear readers, have themes or images that you developed/loved and that were well-received and that you keep saying you will ‘get back to’ and then don’t?!!

Why, I wonder.

Maybe it’s not enough to go back to something just because other people liked it.  Not sure.  Ideas, responses welcome!

Today’s the busy day – writing class in the a.m. (Yikes! must bathe! Must eat breakfast! Must do Morning Pages (writing class is so much better if I do them first)) and then my quilting class (here, thankfully) in the afternoon.

One poppy to remember, another poppy to forget

Just added another poppy to the Cement Sack quilt.  This one is ON TOP of the tulle.

Transferred two black and white xeroxes onto coffee-stained muslin.  The trombone did not come out so well, but a trident on the same page did.  Both are in the upper left.

Here is that figure that has shown up in the Witness quilt and the wet-paper-basement-calamity collage.  She is the one who dreams, who has seen, and who seeks to go beyond all that lodges in the past.  She is part of all of us.  This recent posture is one of burdened grief, but she has other moods as well.

Perhaps “moods” is the wrong word — “patterns of consciousness” more like.

And speaking of drugs (the opiate reference in the title), here is the holder of my current drug of choice — a coffee mug!  Suitably chipped, stained, and very much in use.

A busy day of gardening and travel ahead.  A good thing.  A change of perspective and some fresh air will definitely do me good.

Chronicles of a Garbage-Picking Crafter, II

See that beautiful poppy?

That was part of a cheesy jacket manufactured, oh, around 1972, I’d guess… you know the kind? Based on athletic wear, with knit cuffs and waist and zipper up the front and made of either polyester (the early gross type) or acetate?  Truly awful, in other words.

But, look how pretty that poppy is cut out, stabilized, and partnered with quality quilting cottons.

If you have a local clothes depot, real gems are waiting for you, too.

Cambridge, Mass. offers “Clothes by the Pound”. These are the articles that local Salvation Armies have given up trying to sell. They are heaped in piles on the second floor of an old office building near Kendall Square. One fills a bag, it is weighed, and off you go with a trunk-load of fabric for about $9.00.

While I’ll admit it’s not for everyone (the smell takes some getting used to, for instance), I love it!  One gets down on one’s knees and starts flinging garments around like a dog digging for a bone in the old cartoons.  If I’m there with fellow-treasure-hunter B., we might toss items between us, with commentary such as, “ooooh, an Ann Taylor — I can see you in that!”  The clothes piles invite a scrappy approach to acquisition that I seem to be more comfortable with than traditional shopping.  In fact, I am more comfortable routing around through used crap than trying pants on in an upscale clothing store at the mall (an activity I hate so much that for years I didn’t wear pants, and No, I did not go around half-naked.  I wore skirts.  They can be bought off the rack and fit fairly well).

One problem with a place like Clothes by the Pound is that it spoils you. I’ve gotten so that I wait for SALES at my favorite thrift stores, because $5.00 for a man’s shirt, even a very cool vintage Hawaiian, seems like, well, too much.

And, actually, another problem with Clothes by the Pound is that even though I’m not looking for clothing to wear, I often find great pieces — like a gorgeous 100%  wool J.Crew cable-knit sweater that was originally a Man’s Large, inadvertently shrunk — and now a perfect felted fit for a medium-sized woman.

I’ve learned to look for African fabrics, Indonesian batiks, and Indian madras. Also, anything from Hong Kong, because it tends to be hand-tailored and incredibly high-quality.

This quilt also features fabric from manufacturer’s headers (the green fish print).   Those are fun because fabric companies create sample booklets with colorways, so you would have coordinating prints, or a particular print in five different colors.  All swatches well-sized for a quilting patch.

Lastly, I recommend discovering a curtain maker or upholsterer in your area who would be willing to let you take some of their scraps.  This has been absolutely invaluable to me.  The real boon of a connection like this, especially if either of these sources work for upscale clients (and most people getting custom-made curtains and upholstery, are), is you avail yourself of very expensive linens and drapery weight polished cottons, for example, that you would NEVER pay for (many costing over $100/yard!!).

Happy Hunting!

Jumping In

Season's Greetings

boys running in the dark

boys running in the dark

Pin Board

Pin Board

Three images to start.  How does one start?  Always a question.  “How does one finish?”, also happens to be a question that plagues me.

Starting in the middle, or wherever one is, seems like sage advice, and I didn’t make it up.  See Natalie Goldberg’s books on writing or just about anything by Pema Chodron.

We have snow and it is hanging onto the rooves and curbs, in spite of rain.  At least we have power, unlike many in New Hampshire, or even just west of here in Worcester.

I would like to work faster and larger.  The whole business of quilting takes a long, long time.  It is a wonder I do it at all.  But water?!!  Brushes?!!  More crap in the basement?!!

Last night a scary dream about becoming disoriented… unable to tell which way I came in, I turn, go some distance, turn again, go some distance the other way, hoping something will jog my memory.

Many of my quilts address the uncertain business of memory.  Here is one from awhile ago, from a whole series that I made using poppies as the central image.  Poppies are an apt symbol for our flawed process of collecting bits of ourselves in memory, because they both signal remembrance (popularized during World War I) and forgetting (think:  opiates).   The fragmentation of the design is no accident.  One thing making quilts about memory, and even painful memories, has taught me in a graphic way is that the pattern of a life makes for beauty, no matter what the components.

Quilt

"No Memory Poppy"

Julia Cameron says, “…by claiming our own memories, we gain access to the creative energy that they contain.  Memories become a source, not only of inspiration, but of fuel.”  In this quilt, I cut up a family photo (transferred onto fabric) found in a second-hand store.  I wonder how the whole process would shift were I to use a photo from my own childhood.